Gore

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‘I cannot just brush off scenes of violence, blood and gore, not lớn mention senseless killing.’‘Titles in this category may contain intense violence, blood và gore, sexual nội dung, and/or svào language.’‘Press scrutiny is very limited và declining, as monopocác mục local papers cut back; and TV news, the dominant source of local information, is far more interested in blood & gore.’‘Instead of focusing on blood and gore, she focuses on manuscripts, maps, letters và the places that house them: libraries, archives, và monasteries.’‘I was expecting lớn see blood and gore, but thankfully the slope in that place was not steep & quite grassy.’‘But I think in this day and age, unfortunately, films require a little bit of blood & gore.’‘Unlike the rest of the world, our news coverage of the war remains sanitised, without a glimpse of the blood và gore inflicted upon our soldiers or the women & children.’‘The blood & gore can cause revulsion even in the most hardy.’‘This film doesn"t have sầu to show its claws with blood và gore because the psychological torment is enthralling enough.’‘The most convincing serial-killer movies aren"t the ones drenched in blood và gore, says Gordon Burn.’‘Blood and gore has lined every street, and in every corner the echoes of a million screams can be distinctly heard.’‘There is blood và gore, crumpled oto wreckage and crushed drivers - real pictures of real accident scenes.’‘One by one the ghosts are released, all thirsting for some blood & gore.’‘The older man lead the younger by the arm bachồng inkhổng lồ the room, where the stench of blood and gore seemed khổng lồ have sầu intensified.’‘I found myself squinting and tilting my head, trying lớn pick out what the surgeons are up lớn amid the blood và gore.’‘The more modern theatre revelled in violence, in sharing traumatic indignities và violations, rivalling the slaughter on the streets, spilling blood and gore on the stage.’‘These images unflinchingly confronted the gore, the naked terror, the arrogant incompetence, the pointless cruelty, the insane devastation of the military nightmare.’‘I was genuinely quite shaken by the film, though - it"s all machine guns rattling thunderously in your face and metal clanking noises - but the gore is pretty believable.’‘I can see that reasoning - the gore in modern horror films is generally excised as much as possible, but this is generally in the interest of broadening the audience in the theater.’

Origin


Old English gor ‘dung, dirt’, of Germanic origin; related khổng lồ Dutch goor, Swedish gorr ‘muông xã, filth’. The current sense dates from the mid 16th century.